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Thread: NYC / WTC / World Trade Center Memorial / Developments.

  1. #11
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    Today marks the 7th anniversery of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.

    Victims who were murdered that day are once again being remembered today at Ground Zero, Virginia and Shanksville where Flight 93 was crashed.

    At Ground Zero, a makeshift pool was set up at the foot of the ramp with diagnally placed squares to similate the footprints of the Twin towers. Mourners threw individual flowers into the water as a solumn reminder of their relatives and friends as they were before 09-11.

    A woman who survived the attack and was on the 51st floor in Tower One when the first plane struck had spoke out.

    Presidential nominees McCain and Obama will meet later today at Ground Zero to join in on the rememberance of the victims.

    Persident Bush spoke of the tragedy in front of the White House in front of a large crowd.

    Relatives in Shanksville held ceramonies there to remember the victims who were all murdered on Flight 93.

    In Boston, a new memorial has just opened the other day in time for today's rememberance of the ones who died on AA Flight 11 and UAL Flight 175.

    The new glass struture features a wall inside with the names of all the victims departing Boston that day on those two flights.

    In addition, both AA and UAL employees held small cerimonies at the gates where the two jumbo jetliners dpearted from, marking the times that the planes left the gates and the times that the flights flown into the Twin Towers.
    Last edited by Daquan13; 11th September 2008 at 18:09.

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  3. #12
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    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/02/ny...emorial&st=cse
    At Last, Steel Will Rise at Trade Center Memorial

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    Published: September 1, 2008


    David W. Dunlap/The New York Times

    The first structural steel pieces for the National September 11 Memorial and Museum have arrived at the site of the World Trade Center, and the job of putting them into place begins on Tuesday.



    David W. Dunlap/The New York Times

    The first structural steel pieces for the September 11 Memorial have arrived.


    Forty years ago this summer, construction workers began erecting the steel framework of the World Trade Center. On Tuesday, a new generation of them will begin erecting the steel to frame its memorial.

    Columns and beams from Owen Steel Company’s job No. 7-06 — the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center — started arriving at ground zero last Thursday on flatbed trailers. They are the first of more than 8,000 tons of steel that will be shipped to Lower Manhattan from the Owen fabrication plant in Columbia, S.C.

    “To have it on site and to begin construction is a lift — a necessary lift,” said Joseph C. Daniels, the president and chief executive of the memorial and museum.

    As the seventh anniversary of 9/11 approaches, the arrival of steel is a tangible sign that the new trade center is finally taking form, though long after it was supposed to and at a far higher price.

    “We’ve worked hard to get the memorial back on track and on budget, and to raise necessary funding from many generous donors,” said Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, who is also the chairman of the memorial and museum. “Now we must all ensure it is our collective top priority, so that it’s open by the 10th anniversary.”

    The memorial will be a formally landscaped plaza wrapping around two square voids where the twin towers stood. The names of the victims will be displayed around the voids, which will contain waterfalls and pools. The museum will be entered through a pavilion at plaza level, but most of it will be underground. Visitors will descend gradually past remnants of the twin towers’ columns, a staircase used by hundreds of survivors on 9/11 and an exposed section of the existing slurry wall.

    The memorial and the museum are costing $530 million, financed by private donations and the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation. The $80 million pavilion is to be paid for by New York State.

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is building the memorial, museum and pavilion, which have been designed by Michael Arad, Peter Walker & Partners, Davis Brody Bond and Snohetta.

    The hope is to have the memorial plaza ready for visitors by Sept. 11, 2011, Mr. Daniels said, with pedestrian access all along West Street and, ideally, at the corners of Church and Vesey Streets and Church and Liberty Streets. The museum will follow a year later.

    Because the museum structure underpins the plaza, it must be constructed first. The building will start on Tuesday, with the erection of a 24-foot-9-inch, 7,700-pound steel column.

    David Zalesne, the president of Owen Steel, said welders and fitters welcomed the job, even though many pieces were especially heavy and complex to fabricate. “They certainly take a special pride in putting their hands and their craftsmanship into the World Trade Center memorial,” he said.

    On learning of the coincidental 40th anniversary of the original steel work — and in a nod to the concern that underlies any discussion of the trade center’s future — Mr. Zalesne said quietly, “Let’s hope we never have to build anything new at the site again.”

  4. #13
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    Above all, WTC memorial
    Above all, WTC memorial

    Wednesday, September 24th 2008, 4:00 AM


    Artist's rendering of the World Trade Center Memorial.

    The high-powered committee guiding the redevelopment of Ground Zero will decide Thursday whether to hold the Port Authority to its highest obligation: finishing the permanent 9/11 memorial by the 10th anniversary of the terror attack. And not a day later.

    The panel will meet for one of the final times before the PA releases a revamped plan for finishing the project - with commitments on completion dates and price tags.

    At the top of the agenda must be a rock-solid determination to meet the 9/11/11 deadline.

    As was requested by Gov. Paterson. As was requested by Mayor Bloomberg. As is fervently desired by the families of the 2,751 people murdered in the carnage in lower Manhattan.

    And, outrageously, as appears unlikely to happen because, sources say, the PA is balking at scaling back the overpriced PATH station that has become a drag on the entire development. The biggest problem: its overly grandiose design, which will thwart the 10-year-anniversary goal.

    Newly installed authority Executive Director Chris Ward has only two choices.

    Either 1) significantly revamp the bombastically, unnecessarily gigantic PATH station (which should have happened long ago) in order for the memorial, which sits above it, to be finished on time, or

    2) somehow come up with a heretofore-unknown magical way to build a never-attempted, gravity-defying, vast underground column-free PATH hall in the next two years, 11 months and two weeks.

    Good luck on No. 2.

    Around the table Thursday will be the Port Authority, the state, the city, developer Larry Silverstein, the memorial foundation, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and all the interested parties involved in the complex engineering and construction project that is the Trade Center site.

    By all accounts, the Port is reluctant to give up on its monument to itself, the PATH station.

    The man who must rise to the challenge is Tony Sartor, a New Jersey appointee on the PA's board of commissioners who chairs the WTC development subcommittee.

    Ten years is long enough to wait for the 9/11 memorial. Indeed, it has already been too long.

  5. #14
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    Is it still not too late to consider rebuilding the original twin towers?

  6. #15
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    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/26/ny...l?ref=nyregion
    New Plan Sees 9/11 Memorial Open by 2011

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI
    Published: September 25, 2008

    Port Authority officials have developed a proposal to complete the Sept. 11 memorial at ground zero in time for the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attack and to simplify the nearby transit hub, which they say would resolve two of the most fractious and complex issues plaguing the rebuilding effort downtown.

    The officials now say that the authority, which is overseeing the rebuilding effort, can have most elements of the memorial — a broad landscaped plaza, waterfalls that flow into two underground chambers where the twin towers stood, and parapet walls lined with the names of those killed in the attacks in 2001 and in 1993 — completed by August 2011. This is possible in part because of a new, simplified design for a vast transit mezzanine that would sit beneath the northeast corner of the memorial plaza.

    The proposal emerged at a hastily called meeting of a ground zero working group on Tuesday, only nine days before the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is to unveil a new, more realistic budget and timetable for rebuilding the trade center site with new streets, office towers, a cultural complex, stores and an eight-acre memorial and museum.

    Before that announcement is made, Gov. David A. Paterson and the authority are hoping to reach a consensus among all the relevant government entities and private companies on the way to proceed. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and the memorial foundation have vigorously insisted in recent weeks that the $610 million memorial must be open to the public by Sept. 11, 2011, a goal that the authority had until recently said was impossible.

    On Thursday, some executives expressed guarded optimism about the turn of events. But given seven years of political disputes, broken deadlines and cost overruns, city officials and executives from the memorial foundation are now seeking assurances over the next several days that the authority’s latest plan will be completed on schedule. More important, the foundation, the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, which is raising money to pay for the project, wants the authority to shoulder the burden of any cost increases if construction drags on beyond 2011.

    City and Port Authority officials were reluctant to discuss the latest proposal because it is still subject to negotiations, as well as approval by authority commissioners. But local politicians and members of the community board that includes ground zero embraced the news.

    “We are working around the clock until Oct. 2 on a report that brings certainty to the schedule and budget for the whole site, including the memorial, and a path forward to completing each project as quickly as possible,” said Christopher O. Ward, the authority’s executive director. “No final decisions have been made or will be made until that report.”

    A spokesman for Mayor Bloomberg, Andrew Brent, said, “We’ve come a long way, thanks to the efforts of Chris Ward and Tony Coscia,” who is chairman of the Port Authority. “But there are significant issues that need to be resolved. There are 2 years and 11 months until the 10th anniversary — and we need both a plan and a guarantee that the memorial will be open by that time. That’s the city’s priority, and we will continue to work with the port to develop a plan that can achieve it.”

    Alan J. Gerson, a city councilman whose district includes ground zero, said he welcomed the news that the authority had come up with a way to complete the memorial by 2011, a deadline, he said, that “can and must be met.”

    “Given the history, any deadline announced by the port, or any other level of government, is going to be met with a healthy degree of skepticism,” Mr. Gerson said. “That’s one reason why we’ve proposed hiring an independent auditor general to monitor all the projects downtown.”

    According to half a dozen executives involved in the discussions, the authority’s plan would enable it to complete all the ground-level elements of the memorial and provide public access. The museum, which would be underground, would not be completed until a year later. The cost of the transit hub, which would be completed in May 2014, is expected to grow to about $3 billion, from its current budget of $2.5 billion.

    The proposal to meet the 2011 deadline was made possible in part by a modification of the design for the transit hub mezzanine, a column-free space that will lie directly under part of the memorial plaza. With the help of the architect Santiago Calatrava, the authority would insert four to six columns to hold up a platform on which the memorial plaza would be built, while the mezzanine was constructed below. The plan would retain Mr. Calatrava’s grand vision for the undulating ceiling and clean expanse of the mezzanine and the dramatic birdlike design of the main building, or oculus, at street level.

    “I’m very pleased,” said Julie Menin, chairwoman of Community Board 1. “Otherwise, significant projects on the site would’ve been delayed.”

    The rebuilding of ground zero has been hampered by competing political agendas, long delays, swelling costs and calamities, like the 2007 blaze at the former Deutsche Bank tower in which two firefighters died. The building was severely damaged in the 2001 attack and is still being dismantled.

    George E. Pataki, who tied his legacy as governor to the rebuilding effort, was eager to show progress, but unrealistic deadlines and budgets were often announced before full designs or construction drawings had been produced, officials say. The Bloomberg administration’s focus has waxed and waned over the years.

    In March 2007, state and city officials received an internal report indicating that many projects downtown could be delayed by as much as five years, although the Port Authority largely dismissed the findings.

    In June, Governor Paterson asked the Port Authority, which owns the land at the site, to assess the overall effort and publish an unvarnished report on its findings. The authority’s new executive director, Mr. Ward, acknowledged that the authority faced “significant delays and cost overruns.”

    Mr. Ward organized a committee that identified what he called 15 fundamental issues — including the seemingly endless deconstruction of the former Deutsche Bank building, the restoration of Greenwich Street and the design for a bomb-screening center for tour buses and delivery trucks — that had to be resolved before a realistic schedule could be devised.

    Perhaps none of the 26 separate projects at ground zero is more fraught with emotion and politics than the memorial, which will cover the western half of the site. Like most of the projects, the memorial is inextricably linked to the adjacent $2.5 billion PATH train station and transit hub now under construction.

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