Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Palaces in Mexico D.F.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Palaces in Mexico D.F.

    In 1834 a british traveller toured the streets of Mexico City and had the very same impression than Bernal Diaz del Castillo had three centuries ago; he felt he was in the middle of a dream.

    That british traveller was called Charles Latrobe. It was him who imposed to the mexican capital the title that has accompanied it since then -and that many wrongly attribute to Alexander von Humboldt-:

    The City of the Palaces.



    After toured what by then was known as "las casas grandes" (or 'the big houses') and watching a bunch of manorial buildings built with tezontle and quarry, and being astounded with the bold brag of the courtyards, the arcs, the balconies, the perrons with unusual beauty, Latrobe created the phrase in one of the cards that conform the book -today practically unknown- The Rambler in Mexico.



    No one told him that the buildings that had amazed him, and that in 1834 had barely half century of life, were imagined, created, projected, by one man: The trendy architect by the end of the XVIII century. The artist that printed his own seal in the most important houses and created, nothing the less, what might be called the city style; the architectonic code that embellished like never before the City of The Palaces.



    The common citizens know Manuel Tolsá (any can point out at least two of his work: Palacio de Minería (or Palace of Mining) and the equestrian statue of Carlos IV), but they generally ignore everything about Francisco Guerrero y Torres, and we'll talk about him and his work later.
    Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

  • #2
    Order & Rules.
    Order.

    • Government Buildings
    1. National Palace.
    2. Palace of Mining.
    3. Cityhall.
    4. Postal Palace.
    5. Palace of Inquisition.

    • Private Palaces.
    1. Crystal Palace.
    2. House of Tiles.
    3. Nacional Monte de Piedad.

    • Religious Buildings
    1. Archbishop's Palace.

    • Public Buildings
    • Museums
    1. National Art Museum.
    2. National Museum of Cultures.
    3. National Museum of San Carlos.
    4. Beaux Arts Museum.
    5. Mexico City Museum.
    6. Interactive Museum of Economics.
    7. House of the First Print Shop in the Americas.
    8. Houses of the Mayorazgo de Guerrero.
    9. Palace of Iturbide.
    10. Franz Mayer Museum
    11. Museum of History and Naval Culture.
    12. Palace of Lecumberri.
    13. Academy of San Carlos.
    14. Borda House.
    15. San Ildefonso College.
    16. San Pedro y San Pablo College.
    17. Casa Talavera Cultural Center.
    18. Museum of the Little Shop.
    19. Autonomy Palace.
    20. Chapultepec's Castle.
    • Theaters
    1. Theater of the City.


    Rules.
    • If you're going to post information of any of these buildings, respect the order.
    • Use Arial size 5 for the title.
    • Use the text centered.
    • Not more than 5 photos per post.
    • Post photos of the inside of the palaces.

    An example of how the post should be:

    Government Buildings.
    National Palace.

    Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information.

    Photos.
    Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

    Comment


    • #3
      Government Buildings.
      National Palace.



      The National Palace, (or Palacio Nacional in Spanish), is the seat of the federal executive in Mexico. It is located on Mexico City's main square, the Plaza de la Constitución (El Zócalo). This site has been a palace for the ruling class of Mexico since the Aztec empire, and much of the current palace's building materials are from the original one that belonged to Moctezuma II.

      The facade is bordered on the north and south by two towers and include three main doorways, each of which lead to a different part of the building. The southern door leads to the Patio of Honor and presidential offices (no public access). The northern door is known as the Mariana Door, named in honor of Mariano Arista who had it constructed in 1850. The area next to this door used to be the old Court Prison, with courtrooms and torture chambers. It is now occupied by the Finance Ministry. It contains the Treasury Room, constructed by architects Manuel Ortiz Monasterio and Vicente Mendiola. The iron and bronze door is the work of Augusto Petriccioli.



      Above the central doorway, facing the Zócalo, is the main balcony where just before 11pm on September 15, the president of Mexico gives the Grito de Dolores, in a ceremony to commemorate Mexican Independence. Part of this ceremony includes ringing the bell that hangs above the balcony. This bell is the original one that Father Miguel Hidalgo rang to call for rebellion against Spain. It originally hung in the church of Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato, but was relocated here. In the niche containing the bell, there is the Mexican coat of arms. On each side there is an Aztec eagle knight and his Spanish counterpart. These were sculpted by Manuel Centurion and symbolize the synthesis of Mexican culture and Spanish culture.

      Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

      Comment


      • #4
        Government Buildings.
        National Palace.
        Inside the Palace.







        Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

        Comment


        • #5
          Next: Palace of Mining.
          Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

          Comment


          • #6
            Government Buildings.
            Palace of Mining.



            The Palace of Mining, also Palace of Mines, (Spanish: Palacio de Minería) in Mexico City is one of the masterpieces of Neoclassical architecture in the Americas. It was designed and built between 1797 and 1813 by Valencian Spanish sculptor and architect Manuel Tolsá. It was built to house the Royal School of Mines and Mining of the Royal Court at the request of its director, Fausto Delhuyar, a known mineralogist. Later it housed other institutions such as the National University, the School of Engineering, College of Mines and the Physics Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

            Today it is a museum that belongs to the Faculty of Engineering of the UNAM.

            The building is located on Tacuba Street opposite the Plaza Manuel Tolsá and the equestrian statue (Carlos IV of Spain) also sculpted by Tolsá.



            The history of the Palace of Mines dates back to 1793 when the Royal College of Mines of New Spain acquired the land where the building now stands with the help of Viceroy Juan Vicente de Guemes, Second Count of Revillagigedo who commissioned the design and construction to the prominent architect Manuel Tolsá, who was also the sculptor of the equestrian sculpture of Charles IV, known as "El Caballito" as well as the final stage of construction of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Mexico City. The Mining Palace was one of the first buildings designed for teaching engineering and metallurgy, all the more important as mining was the main economic activity of New Spain and one of the main sources of riches of the Spanish Empire. The Mining Palace therefore reflected in its sober and elegant architecturally maintained proportions, the Enlightenment ideal of reason and order to attain knowledge and how that knowledge could positively transform reality through scientific exploitation of mineral resources, thus becoming one of the first institutions for technological development in the Americas.



            After military revolts that occurred during the first half of the nineteenth century and after a partial reconstruction by architect Antonio Villard, without altering the original design of Manuel Tolsá, the Mining Palace was closed and was even considered for use as the imperial palace of Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico before he chose the Castle of Chapultepec as his residence. Years later, the Palace of Mining had various uses until in 1867 when it regained its original purpose of housing the Special School Engineers and it remained as such for almost a hundred years before it was transferred in 1954 to the building of the current Faculty of Engineering, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria.



            Inside this magnificent building are the Courtyard, the Lecture Hall, the former chapel of the Virgin of Guadalupe and its lavish steps, immortalized by various artists and writers throughout history. Currently the Palace of Mining is part of the heritage of the UNAM, and in it are held various conferences, courses, and events including the International Book Fair of the Mining Palace, one of the more significant literary events in the city, wherein editorial conferences of publishers from the Spanish-speaking world are held. It also houses the Museo Manuel Tolsá, the Historical Heritage, the Center for Information and Documentation "Bruno Mascanzoni" as well as various trade associations, including the Society of Alumni of the Faculty of Engineering (SEFI), the College of Petroleum Engineers of Mexico and the Mexican Academy of Engineering.

            Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

            Comment


            • #7
              Government Buildings.
              Palace of Mining.
              Inside the Palace.



              Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

              Comment


              • #8
                Government Buildings.
                Cityhall.



                The cityhall of Mexico was the legislative and administrative entity of Mexico City created in 1522 during the Spanish government until 1928 in the independent Mexico, when the Cityhall was suppresed.



                This old baroque building is not the seat of the Executive Power of the Federal District of Mexico (México D. F.). Inside it has an important historical heritage such as the Salón de Cabildos (or Hall of Councils) or the Center of Documentation "Francisco Gamoneda".



                It was built with the stones of the temples of the mexicas, and so were some other houses of opulent families.

                Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Goverment Buildings.
                  Cityhall.
                  Inside the Palace.







                  Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Next: Postal Palace.
                    Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Government Buildings.
                      Postal Palace.



                      The Palacio de Correos de Mexico (Postal Palace of Mexico City) also known as the "Correo Mayor" (Main Post Office) is located in the historic center of Mexico City, on the Eje Central (Lazaro Cardenas) near the Palacio de Bellas Artes. It was built at the very beginning of the 20th century, when the Post Office here became a separate government entity. Its design and construction was the most modern of the time, including a very eclectic style mixing several different traditions into a very complex design. In the 1950s, the building was modified in a way to cause stress and damage, so when the 1985 earthquake struck Mexico City, this building was heavily damaged. In the 1990s, restoration work has brought the building back to original construction and appearance.



                      In 1901, the Dirección General de Correos (General Direction of Mail) was made a separate government agency. Before, it has been an administrative division of the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation. It was then decided that this function should have its own building, in part due the volume of mail being handled annually at that time, which was about 130 million pieces. The site chosen was the old Hospital of Terceros Franciscanos, which was demolished in 1902. The foundation laid was a new technique called "Chicago" consisting of a concrete slab with a thickness of 70 cm reinforced with steel beams. This foundation was mostly constructed in New York, by the Millinken Brothers and shipped to Mexico in 1903. The first stone of the building was placed on 14 September 1902, and work on the building lasted for another five years. In 1907, the building was inaugurated by then president of Mexico, Porfirio Diaz, who, in a symbolic act, dropped two postcards into the receiving bin, one addressed to a location in Mexico City, and one addressed to a different locale in the country. For some time after it was built, this palace was also called the Quinta Casa de Correos (Fifth House of Mail), since it was the fifth building to house postal services in Mexico City.

                      Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Government Buildings.
                        Postal Palace.
                        Inside the Palace.







                        Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Government Buildings.
                          Inquisition Palace.



                          The Palace of the Inquisition stands on the corner of Republica de Brasil and Republica de Venezuela streets in Mexico City, Mexico. While neither side of the building faces the Santo Domingo Plaza, the entrance does, as it is placed at the corner, which is canted to allow it to face in that direction. Its long association with the Inquisition, which ended during the Mexican War of Independence, made it difficult to convert to other purposes.[1] However, it eventually became the School of Medicine for the reconstructed National University (now the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)). When UNAM moved to the Ciudad Universitaria in the 1950s, it retained ownership of this building, eventually converting the structure in what is today the Museum of Mexican Medicine.



                          From nearly the beginning of the colonial period until the Mexican War of Independence, this spot has been the headquarters of the Inquisition in the colony of New Spain. While the Tribunal of the Holy Inquisition was not fully established here until 1571, the first cleric with inquisitorial duties was Martin de Valencia, who came to the colony in 1524. The Dominicans, in whom the papacy had invested Inquisition duties, arrived in 1526 and proceeded to build a monastery in the area occupied by both the current Palace and the Church of Santo Domingo. The first official Inquisitor for the colony, Pedro Moya de Contreras, worked in the section of the monastery where the later, 18th century Palace would be built.

                          The Inquisition was officially established here due to a 1566 conspiracy led by Martin Cortes, son of Hernán Cortés, threatened to make the new colony independent of Spain. The plot was denounced by Baltazar de Aguilar Cervantes and Inquisition trials of various Creoles began. The accused were subject to torture and harsh sentences, especially when before a magistrate by the name of Muñoz. The first victims of this series of trials were the brothers Alonso and Gil Gonzalez de Alvila Alvarado. Despite having the sympathy of the local citizens and of the chroniclers, both brothers were convicted. Their punishment was to be decapitated, and their house, located on part of the site of the Templo Mayor, was razed to the ground, and the site sown with salt.



                          The Inquisition here heard a number of other famous cases during its time, including the prosecution of the Carbajal family for reversion to Judaism, and the case of Martin Villavicencio, alias Martin Garatuza, which would inspire one of the best-known 19th century Mexican novels, Vicente Riva Palacio's Martín Gartuza. Servando Teresa de Mier spent time in the jail here, and this court sentenced Miguel Hidalgo to defrocking and excommunication before his 1811 execution. Soon after, in 1820, the Inquisition was officially disbanded in Mexico.
                          Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Government Buildings.
                            Inquisition Palace.
                            Inside the Palace.





                            Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Private Palaces.
                              Crystal Palace.



                              The Museo Universitario del Chopo (meaning, "poplar"; locally nicknamed Crystal Palace or simply El Chopo, in Spanish) (Chopo University Museum) is located at Doctor Enrique González Martínez Street in the Colonia Santa María la Ribera of Mexico City. It has collections in contemporary art, and is part of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).



                              The building was designed by Bruno Möhring as a pavilion for a 1902 art and textile exhibition in Düsseldorf, Germany. It was manufactured in Oberhausen by Gutehoffnungshütte. After the exhibition fair was over, three of the building's four halls were purchased by José Landero y Coss for the establishment of the Compañía Mexicana de Exposición Permanente, shipped to Mexico, and reassembled between 1903 and 1905 at the Colonia Santa María la Ribera site, under the auspices of the engineers Hugo Dorner Bacmeister and Aurelio Luis Ruelas.



                              In 1905, Landero y Coss' company went bankrupt and in 1909, a lease was signed with the then Department of Public Instruction and Fine Arts, to allocate the building to the National Museum of Natural History. In the following year, the building was used to house the Japanese Pavilion at the Universal Exhibition of Mexico, which was held as part of Mexico's celebrations of the centenary of Independence. It was at this time when the building was known as the Crystal Palace, due to its steel beams, columns, and windows, which resembled the 1851 structure in London, There is no record of any other activity carried on the premises until the December 1, 1913, when it opened as the National Museum of Natural History,whose founding collection came from the collection of Culture Museum, located in the City Centre, with sections in Botany, Zoology, Biology, Mineralogy and Geology. In 1926, the widow of Andrew Carnegie donated a Jurassic dinosaur, Diplodocus, to the museum, which defined the identity of the museum for decades.

                              In 1964, the museum was closed and the collections were transferred to other museums and university departments. After being abandoned for close to ten years, in 1973 UNAM began to rehabilitate the space; on 25 November 1975, the Chopo Museum was inaugurated. From 2004–2010, an update, expansion and renovation of the museum was done by UNAM and the architecture firm TEN Arquitectos.
                              Speramus meliora. Resurget cineribus.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X