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Thread: Palaces in Mexico D.F.

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    Default Palaces in Mexico D.F.

    In 1834 a british traveller toured the streets of Mexico City and had the very same impression than Bernal Diaz del Castillo had three centuries ago; he felt he was in the middle of a dream.

    That british traveller was called Charles Latrobe. It was him who imposed to the mexican capital the title that has accompanied it since then -and that many wrongly attribute to Alexander von Humboldt-:

    The City of the Palaces.



    After toured what by then was known as "las casas grandes" (or 'the big houses') and watching a bunch of manorial buildings built with tezontle and quarry, and being astounded with the bold brag of the courtyards, the arcs, the balconies, the perrons with unusual beauty, Latrobe created the phrase in one of the cards that conform the book -today practically unknown- The Rambler in Mexico.



    No one told him that the buildings that had amazed him, and that in 1834 had barely half century of life, were imagined, created, projected, by one man: The trendy architect by the end of the XVIII century. The artist that printed his own seal in the most important houses and created, nothing the less, what might be called the city style; the architectonic code that embellished like never before the City of The Palaces.



    The common citizens know Manuel Tolsá (any can point out at least two of his work: Palacio de Miner*a (or Palace of Mining) and the equestrian statue of Carlos IV), but they generally ignore everything about Francisco Guerrero y Torres, and we'll talk about him and his work later.

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    Order & Rules.
    Order.

    • Government Buildings

    1. National Palace.
    2. Palace of Mining.
    3. Cityhall.
    4. Postal Palace.
    5. Palace of Inquisition.

    • Private Palaces.

    1. Crystal Palace.
    2. House of Tiles.
    3. Nacional Monte de Piedad.

    • Religious Buildings

    1. Archbishop's Palace.

    • Public Buildings

    • Museums

    1. National Art Museum.
    2. National Museum of Cultures.
    3. National Museum of San Carlos.
    4. Beaux Arts Museum.
    5. Mexico City Museum.
    6. Interactive Museum of Economics.
    7. House of the First Print Shop in the Americas.
    8. Houses of the Mayorazgo de Guerrero.
    9. Palace of Iturbide.
    10. Franz Mayer Museum
    11. Museum of History and Naval Culture.
    12. Palace of Lecumberri.
    13. Academy of San Carlos.
    14. Borda House.
    15. San Ildefonso College.
    16. San Pedro y San Pablo College.
    17. Casa Talavera Cultural Center.
    18. Museum of the Little Shop.
    19. Autonomy Palace.
    20. Chapultepec's Castle.

    • Theaters

    1. Theater of the City.


    Rules.

    • If you're going to post information of any of these buildings, respect the order.
    • Use Arial size 5 for the title.
    • Use the text centered.
    • Not more than 5 photos per post.
    • Post photos of the inside of the palaces.

    An example of how the post should be:

    Government Buildings.
    National Palace.

    Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information. Information.

    Photos.

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    Government Buildings.
    National Palace.



    The National Palace, (or Palacio Nacional in Spanish), is the seat of the federal executive in Mexico. It is located on Mexico City's main square, the Plaza de la Constitución (El Zócalo). This site has been a palace for the ruling class of Mexico since the Aztec empire, and much of the current palace's building materials are from the original one that belonged to Moctezuma II.

    The facade is bordered on the north and south by two towers and include three main doorways, each of which lead to a different part of the building. The southern door leads to the Patio of Honor and presidential offices (no public access). The northern door is known as the Mariana Door, named in honor of Mariano Arista who had it constructed in 1850. The area next to this door used to be the old Court Prison, with courtrooms and torture chambers. It is now occupied by the Finance Ministry. It contains the Treasury Room, constructed by architects Manuel Ortiz Monasterio and Vicente Mendiola. The iron and bronze door is the work of Augusto Petriccioli.



    Above the central doorway, facing the Zócalo, is the main balcony where just before 11pm on September 15, the president of Mexico gives the Grito de Dolores, in a ceremony to commemorate Mexican Independence. Part of this ceremony includes ringing the bell that hangs above the balcony. This bell is the original one that Father Miguel Hidalgo rang to call for rebellion against Spain. It originally hung in the church of Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato, but was relocated here. In the niche containing the bell, there is the Mexican coat of arms. On each side there is an Aztec eagle knight and his Spanish counterpart. These were sculpted by Manuel Centurion and symbolize the synthesis of Mexican culture and Spanish culture.


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    Government Buildings.
    National Palace.
    Inside the Palace.








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    Next: Palace of Mining.

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