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Thread: Palaces in Mexico D.F.

  1. #11
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    Government Buildings.
    Postal Palace.



    The Palacio de Correos de Mexico (Postal Palace of Mexico City) also known as the "Correo Mayor" (Main Post Office) is located in the historic center of Mexico City, on the Eje Central (Lazaro Cardenas) near the Palacio de Bellas Artes. It was built at the very beginning of the 20th century, when the Post Office here became a separate government entity. Its design and construction was the most modern of the time, including a very eclectic style mixing several different traditions into a very complex design. In the 1950s, the building was modified in a way to cause stress and damage, so when the 1985 earthquake struck Mexico City, this building was heavily damaged. In the 1990s, restoration work has brought the building back to original construction and appearance.



    In 1901, the Dirección General de Correos (General Direction of Mail) was made a separate government agency. Before, it has been an administrative division of the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation. It was then decided that this function should have its own building, in part due the volume of mail being handled annually at that time, which was about 130 million pieces. The site chosen was the old Hospital of Terceros Franciscanos, which was demolished in 1902. The foundation laid was a new technique called "Chicago" consisting of a concrete slab with a thickness of 70 cm reinforced with steel beams. This foundation was mostly constructed in New York, by the Millinken Brothers and shipped to Mexico in 1903. The first stone of the building was placed on 14 September 1902, and work on the building lasted for another five years. In 1907, the building was inaugurated by then president of Mexico, Porfirio Diaz, who, in a symbolic act, dropped two postcards into the receiving bin, one addressed to a location in Mexico City, and one addressed to a different locale in the country. For some time after it was built, this palace was also called the Quinta Casa de Correos (Fifth House of Mail), since it was the fifth building to house postal services in Mexico City.


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  3. #12
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    Government Buildings.
    Postal Palace.
    Inside the Palace.








  4. #13
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    Government Buildings.
    Inquisition Palace.



    The Palace of the Inquisition stands on the corner of Republica de Brasil and Republica de Venezuela streets in Mexico City, Mexico. While neither side of the building faces the Santo Domingo Plaza, the entrance does, as it is placed at the corner, which is canted to allow it to face in that direction. Its long association with the Inquisition, which ended during the Mexican War of Independence, made it difficult to convert to other purposes.[1] However, it eventually became the School of Medicine for the reconstructed National University (now the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)). When UNAM moved to the Ciudad Universitaria in the 1950s, it retained ownership of this building, eventually converting the structure in what is today the Museum of Mexican Medicine.



    From nearly the beginning of the colonial period until the Mexican War of Independence, this spot has been the headquarters of the Inquisition in the colony of New Spain. While the Tribunal of the Holy Inquisition was not fully established here until 1571, the first cleric with inquisitorial duties was Martin de Valencia, who came to the colony in 1524. The Dominicans, in whom the papacy had invested Inquisition duties, arrived in 1526 and proceeded to build a monastery in the area occupied by both the current Palace and the Church of Santo Domingo. The first official Inquisitor for the colony, Pedro Moya de Contreras, worked in the section of the monastery where the later, 18th century Palace would be built.

    The Inquisition was officially established here due to a 1566 conspiracy led by Martin Cortes, son of Hernán Cortés, threatened to make the new colony independent of Spain. The plot was denounced by Baltazar de Aguilar Cervantes and Inquisition trials of various Creoles began. The accused were subject to torture and harsh sentences, especially when before a magistrate by the name of Muñoz. The first victims of this series of trials were the brothers Alonso and Gil Gonzalez de Alvila Alvarado. Despite having the sympathy of the local citizens and of the chroniclers, both brothers were convicted. Their punishment was to be decapitated, and their house, located on part of the site of the Templo Mayor, was razed to the ground, and the site sown with salt.



    The Inquisition here heard a number of other famous cases during its time, including the prosecution of the Carbajal family for reversion to Judaism, and the case of Martin Villavicencio, alias Martin Garatuza, which would inspire one of the best-known 19th century Mexican novels, Vicente Riva Palacio's Mart*n Gartuza. Servando Teresa de Mier spent time in the jail here, and this court sentenced Miguel Hidalgo to defrocking and excommunication before his 1811 execution. Soon after, in 1820, the Inquisition was officially disbanded in Mexico.

  5. #14
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    Government Buildings.
    Inquisition Palace.
    Inside the Palace.






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    Private Palaces.
    Crystal Palace.



    The Museo Universitario del Chopo (meaning, "poplar"; locally nicknamed Crystal Palace or simply El Chopo, in Spanish) (Chopo University Museum) is located at Doctor Enrique González Mart*nez Street in the Colonia Santa Mar*a la Ribera of Mexico City. It has collections in contemporary art, and is part of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).



    The building was designed by Bruno Möhring as a pavilion for a 1902 art and textile exhibition in Düsseldorf, Germany. It was manufactured in Oberhausen by Gutehoffnungshütte. After the exhibition fair was over, three of the building's four halls were purchased by José Landero y Coss for the establishment of the Compañ*a Mexicana de Exposición Permanente, shipped to Mexico, and reassembled between 1903 and 1905 at the Colonia Santa Mar*a la Ribera site, under the auspices of the engineers Hugo Dorner Bacmeister and Aurelio Luis Ruelas.



    In 1905, Landero y Coss' company went bankrupt and in 1909, a lease was signed with the then Department of Public Instruction and Fine Arts, to allocate the building to the National Museum of Natural History. In the following year, the building was used to house the Japanese Pavilion at the Universal Exhibition of Mexico, which was held as part of Mexico's celebrations of the centenary of Independence. It was at this time when the building was known as the Crystal Palace, due to its steel beams, columns, and windows, which resembled the 1851 structure in London, There is no record of any other activity carried on the premises until the December 1, 1913, when it opened as the National Museum of Natural History,whose founding collection came from the collection of Culture Museum, located in the City Centre, with sections in Botany, Zoology, Biology, Mineralogy and Geology. In 1926, the widow of Andrew Carnegie donated a Jurassic dinosaur, Diplodocus, to the museum, which defined the identity of the museum for decades.

    In 1964, the museum was closed and the collections were transferred to other museums and university departments. After being abandoned for close to ten years, in 1973 UNAM began to rehabilitate the space; on 25 November 1975, the Chopo Museum was inaugurated. From 2004–2010, an update, expansion and renovation of the museum was done by UNAM and the architecture firm TEN Arquitectos.

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