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    Default Amazing bridges design / Around the world

    Amazing bridges design



    Photo By: kingdigitalmedia@yahoo.com

    Today’s bridges not only symbolize our world’s advancement in design, its advancement in technology as well.

    Consequently, architects and engineers have been able to merge design and technology together in order to create bridges that are bigger, better, and more spectacular than ever before.

    Several of these are simply stunning – a true marvel of classic engineering capabilities with the outstanding achievements of modern engineering.

    -----------------------------

    The purpose of this theme is to put information and pictures of incredible bridges of all types with good designs I hope you like it and you feel free to participate.

    Greetings.
    Last edited by Rikkrdo; 20th June 2012 at 06:47.

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    Kurilpa Bridge / Cox Rayner Architects with Arup



    Architect: Cox Rayner Architects
    Location: Tank Street, Brisbane,Queensland 4000 Australia
    Project Year: 2009
    Cost at completion of construction: $63M
    Gross floor area (m2): Span 130 metres
    Project Team:Michael Rayner, Antony Scott Pegum, Hang Ling, Casey Vallance, Philip Cox, TristramCarfrae ,Ian Ainsworth, Tom James
    Consultant Team: Arup
    Photographs: Christopher Frederick Jones, Roger D’Souza



    The Kurilpa Bridge project was an opportunity to not only make a new pedestrian and cycle connection across Brisbane’s river but also new forms of public space, as well as a symbol of a city forging its identity at the forefront of art, science and technology. Its origins as a physical link lay in our own late 1990s planning coinciding with the design of the Brisbane Magistrates Court, its value enhanced by the revitalisation of Queensland’s Cultural Precinct and the emerging city precincts in the northern CBD and South Brisbane. Its conceptualisation, based upon Buckminster Fuller’s principles of tensegrity, was to simultaneously resolve unusual physical challenges, such as navigational constraints and motorway spanning, and embrace the spirit of a city relaxed, subtropical city seeking to prioritise walking, cycling and healthy lifestyle. Equally, the design of the structure and its spaces is conceived to celebrate and engage with the river both viewed from its vantage points and viewed out from its primary and ancillary spaces. Lastly, on an international perspective, it is designed to embody and convey Brisbane’s emergence as a contemporary design city.





    The underlying intent of the design of Kurilpa Bridge was to reinforce and embody the relaxed, informal intrinsic nature of Brisbane and its subtropical environment. Having explored each conventional bridge form during the major architectural competition (arch, tube, suspension and girder), we saw in the tensegrity typology a potential to enrich this city’s character and vitality, to celebrate its emerging design identity expressed in the adjoining cultural precinct, and to create public spatial diversity beyond those possible in standard bridge forms.



    Kurilpa Bridge provides for Brisbane a significant pedestrian and cycle way that both connects its CBD and Cultural Precinct, and forms a completed loop of movement between South Bank and the CBD together with the Goodwill Bridge. Its design creates new spatial experiences for Brisbane and its visitors, both in itself and in appreciation of the river. For Brisbane’s indigenous people, it has important meaning as connecting across the place in the river where their ancestors travelled, this significance being expressed in stories, written by Jagera and Turrbal peoples, along the journey.





    The form of Kurilpa Bridge evolved from analysis of other (more conventional) structures, which for the physical spanning and foundation conditions, all generated massive visual impacts on the context. The tensegrity typology was explored for its ability to enable design to predominate over engineering constraints, and refined to create interesting scale relationships with the Gallery of Modern Art, the South East Freeway and the CBD. This process involved wide design consultation with community organisations, the Gallery and indigenous representatives, the latter in particular regarding Kurilpa Park.

    Kurilpa Bridge / Cox Rayner Architects with Arup
    by ArchDaily



    Source: Kurilpa Bridge / Cox Rayner Architects with Arup | ArchDaily

    Greetings.

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    Helix Bridge / Cox Architecture with Architects 61



    Photo By: www.glenespinosa.com

    Architects: Cox Architecture + Architects 61
    Location: The Helix at Raffles Avenue and Bayfront Bridge, Singapore
    Project Year: 2010
    Cost at completion of construction: SGD$82,900,000
    Project Area: 1379.08 sqm
    Project Team: Philip Cox, Michael Rayner, Hang Chung Ling, Spyros Barberis, Lynn Heng, Michael Ngu, Siti Suriah Taib, Sunita Menon.
    Consultant Team: Arup – Structural consultant, Arup – Civil consultant, Arup – Mechanical consultant, Arup – Electrical consultant, Arup – Lighting consultant, Tierra Design – Landscape consultant, Davis Langdon Seah – Cost Consultant.
    Construction Team: Sato Kogyo (S) Pte Ltd – Builder



    The Helix Bridge provides a pedestrian connection across the head of the Singapore River between the city’s existing CBD and its new Bayfront district. Its commission was the result of a selected 36-entry international design competition held in 2006.

    The plan concept was to curve the bridge in an arc so that it arrives fluidly into foreshore promenades on each side. It also enabled the bridge to connect in its centre to an adjacent vehicular bridge’s footpath while shifting away from it beyond this point of junction.



    Photo By: sactyr

    Seeking a delicate, lightweight contrast to the vehicular bridge, the concept evolved of a double helix structure. This form enabled the canopy, required by the brief, to be integrated as segmented panels of glass and perforated steel, unlike other bridge structures. The structural typology also proved highly effective in working to a curvilinear plan, and in generating an intriguing sense of movement flow along the journey.

    The Helix Bridge is illuminated at night by ribbons of LED lighting accentuating the interplay of the two helix tubes and their intervening, connecting ties. Four ovular-shaped ‘pods’ cantilever out from the structure enabling people to gain wider appreciation of the bridge form and providing gathering space for viewing bay events.





    Photos By: mchphoto

    The design of The Helix Bridge responds to the brief of an international architectural competition calling for a unique structural form that could be symbolic of Singapore’s goal of promoting the identity of Asia’s ‘connected city’. The plan concept was to curve the bridge away from an adjoining linear vehicular bridge, such that it touched at a point for pedestrian interconnection, yet descended in each direction to fluidly continue along existing promenades at each end. The double helix structure was conceived as both a highly efficient and exciting form that integrated with the curvilinear plan. It forms a dynamic spatial experience as well as, unlike other bridge structures, enables the canopy to be integrated into the segments between the helix tubes and their interconnecting ties.



    he bridge design is the product of inseparable collaboration between architect (Cox Rayner / Architects 61) and engineer Arup. Its recognition as an art form also stimulated the Government to create an adjoining Art Park comprising school student works which we assisted in selecting siting. Cost / Value Arup found that for its 280 metre length, the dual helix structure utilises 5 times less steel than a conventional box girder bridge. This finding enabled the client to direct the structure to be constructed entirely of stainless steel for its longevity. Sustainability The bridge’s environmental performance is implicit in the use of minimal steel noted above, this being a key objective of the design.

    Photo By: bboylanky

    Helix Bridge / Cox Rayner Architects
    by ArchDaily



    Source: http://www.archdaily.com/185400/heli...architects-61/

    Greetings.

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    Dominique Perrault: The arganzuela footbridge



    Client: madrid city council, madrid, spain
    Site area: 100, 000 m
    Built area: foot bridge 150 m (section 1) 128 m (section 2) length, 5 to 12 m width
    Engineering: MC2 / julio martinz calzon, madrid (structure);
    TYPSA, madrid (mechanical engineering)



    Arqanzuela footbridge' by paris-based architect dominique perrault has opened to the public in madrid, spain. Stretching over the Manzanares River in to the park, the project is the architect'sfirst civil engineering work and is distinguished by a pair of conic structures that are wrapped in interlocking metallic ribbons.



    Providing a direct passage from one side of the river to the other, the footbridge also gives access to both pedestrians and cyclists to the expansive park below. The porous design allows natural sunlight to penetrate through to the foliage of the park, while establishing sight linesalong the length of the span. The design is over 250 meters long, subtly expanding in its diameter from 5 to 12 meters.



    Utilizing the structural aid of two pillars laid at each end, the footbridge seeming floats inthe air over the water. The skin is constructed out of metallic mesh which shelters the internalspace from extreme weathers. interspersedly offering moments of complete transparency, the spiral provides a rhythmic and dynamic experience for the pedestrians.



    Puente de Arganzuela
    ProyectosSingulares



    Source: dominique perrault: the arganzuela footbridge
    Greetings.

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