Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: New York City Subway Tunnels Flooded after Hurricane Sandy!

  1. #1
    Daquan13's Avatar
    Moderator

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,005
    Liked
    113 times
    Rep Power
    11

    Default New York City Subway Tunnels Flooded after Hurricane Sandy!

    MTA releases photos of standing water being pumped out from subway tunnels connecting Manhattan with Brooklyn and Queens

    The MTA released photos on its Flickr account page showing how they are using a ‘pump train’ to remove some 30 inches of water from the A/C train’s Cranberry Street Tunnel and the E/M train’s 53rd Street Tunnel, which connect Manhattan with Brooklyn and Queens.
    Comments (9)
    By Victoria Cavaliere / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

    Saturday, November 3, 2012, 1:37 PM.


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit


    New York City Transit employees pump water out of the Cranberry Street Tunnel, which carries the A and C trains between Brooklyn and Manhattan underneath the East River.

    MTA workers are laboring around the clock to clear standing water from train tunnels linking Manhattan with Brooklyn and Queens, and an inside view of the process gives startling perspective to the sheer size of the project.

    The MTA released photos on its Flickr account page showing some 30 inches of water clogging the Cranberry Street Tunnel, which carries the A and C trains between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and the 53rd Street Tunnel, which carries the E and M trains between Queens and Manhattan.

    EARLIER: SIX-CAR PUMP TRAIN HELPS GET SUBWAYS BACK ON TRACK AFTER SANDY

    Hydraulic teams and a massive “pump train” are vacuuming out the water, letting it flow back to the rivers. Each pump can remove 1,500 gallons of water per minute.


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit

    The 'pump train' siphons water out of the Cranberry Street Tunnel.

    As service is restored, crews must examine 600 miles of track and the electrical systems throughout the system.

    With power restored to most of Manhattan early Saturday, MTA officials moved a little closer to restoring train service in the lower part of the borough and to Brooklyn. Crews were also feverishly vacuuming water from the Joralemon Tunnel, which carries the 4 and 5 trains, and on Thursday the pump train was removing water from the route of the 1 train.


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit

    The hydraulics team hook up the submersible hose, which sucks water from the track surface.

    "Everyone is working around the clock: Workers. Management. Nobody's standing around," MTA crew member Tommy Dropp told the Daily News on Thursday.


    Leonard Wiggins/MTA New York City Transit

    As service is restored, crews must examine 600 miles of track and the electrical systems throughout the system.


    Read more: MTA releases photos of standing water being pumped out from subway tunnels connecting Manhattan with Brooklyn and Queens - NY Daily News
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Daquan13; 14th November 2012 at 06:11.

  2.   
     
  3. #2
    Daquan13's Avatar
    Moderator

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,005
    Liked
    113 times
    Rep Power
    11

    Default Could These Giant Plugs Have Stopped NYC Subways from Flooding During Hurricane Sandy

    Could These Giant Plugs Have Prevented NYC Subways from Flooding During Hurricane Sandy?

    by Yuka Yoneda



    The Department of Homeland Security came up with these giant inflatable plugs as a way to stop terrorist attacks in underground tunnels, but to many New Yorkers who waited on bus lines for 2 hours today, they look like massive coulda, woulda, shouldas. It’s important to point out that the 32-by-16-foot plugs are just prototypes for now and, according to Department of Homeland Security project manager John Fortune, were not ready to be deployed at the time Hurricane Sandy hit New York City this week. Still, the plug’s developers feel that things could have been done differently to speed up the process, and everyone in New York of course, wishes they had.



    If the plugs had been ready this week, they could have been placed in subway tunnels and inflated, keeping water out like enormous bathtub stoppers. Some at ILC Dover, the company that manufactures the plugs, felt that if more had been done to get the plugs to a usable stage, they could have been used to stop flooding in NYC subway tunnels this week. “We’ve proved that these plugs can hold back water,” said Dave Cadogan of ILC Dover, which also makes spacesuits and blimp bodies. “I wish we had moved a little bit faster as a team and had gotten this development done.”

    Cagodan is referring to a test that was performed in January, where the Department of Homeland Security used a 16-foot diameter prototype to hold back pressurized water in a test tunnel in Morgantown, West Virginia. They are planning to run a similar test to demonstrate the plug’s reliability next week.

    The existing 32″ x 16″ plugs can hold 35,000 gallons of water and developers told CNN that if they’d been placed at the end of some of the tunnels under the East River, could have prevented water from gushing into the subway system. However, they also added that the plugs wouldn’t have been able to control water coming through other sources like porous underground subway stations. And the bottom line is that while we certainly wish the Department of Homeland Security had foreseen their possible use as flood barriers, the plugs just weren’t ready yet.

    But that doesn’t mean that they can’t be ready for the next time NYC faces a super storm like Sandy, because in all likelihood, it will.

    http://inhabitat.com/nyc/could-these...rricane-sandy/
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #3
    ElPorteño's Avatar
    Senior Member

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Buenos Aires
    Posts
    613
    Liked
    2159 times
    Rep Power
    5
    Argentina

    Default

    incredibles photos! for my eyes this is subrreal! haha! more pics please!

    Sorry for my poor english !

    saludos!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
SkyScraperLife.Com © 2006-2015

World Building Database

Download: Fast, Fun, Awesome - Web Stats