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Thread: Knowing Warzawa

  1. #6
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    Nice pics Rikk! I will go to Poland probably this year...but I did not see untill this moment photos from Warsav in order to think that this city will be special beside the other central Europe cities...we will see...I hope to be wrong!

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  3. #7
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    Some Pics of Warsaw





















    Photos By: joaoleitao

    Cheers

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    Lazienki Palace



    Lazienki Palace (Polish: Palac Lazienkowski) also called Palace on the Water (Polish: Palac na Wodzie) or Palace on the Isle (Polish: Palac na Wyspie) is a Neoclassical palace in Lazienki Park in Warsaw.
    It was a barracks until the 1960s.

    Originally a bathhouse for powerful aristocrat Stanislaw Herakliusz Lubomirski, built on an islet in the middle of a lake by Tylman van Gameren. It was completely remodelled by Domenico Merlini between 1764 and 1795 to fulfil Stanislaw August Poniatowski's need for a private residence where he could relax. Stanislaw August was a great patron of the arts, and this is reflected in the sumptuous interiors of the main palace. A good deal of the monarch's original collection has survived. During World War II, Wehrmacht sappers bored tens of thousands of holes in the Palace in the stripped walls that they intended to fill with dynamite, but they only succeeded in setting the Palace alight and causing limited damage to the first floor.

    The palace is built on an artificial island that divides the lake into two parts, a smaller northern lake and a bigger southern lake; it is connected by two Ionic colonnaded bridges to the rest of the park. The facades are unified by an entablature carried by a giant Corinthian order of pilasters that links its two floors and is crowned by a balustrade that bears statues of mythological figures. The north facade is relieved by a central pedimented portico. On the south front a deep central recess lies behind a screen of the Corinthian order carried across its front.
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    Photo By:nancepants



    Photo By: drquimbo

    Greetings

  5. #9
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    Palace of Culture and Science



    The Palace of Culture and Science (Polish: Palac Kultury i Nauki, also abbreviated PKiN) in Warsaw is the tallest building in Poland, the seventh tallest building in the European Union, and the world's 187th tallest building at 237 metres (778 ft). The building was originally known as the Joseph Stalin Palace of Culture and Science (Palac Kultury i Nauki imienia Jozefa Stalina), but in the wake of destalinization the dedication was revoked; Stalin's name was removed from the interior lobby and one of the building's sculptures.

    Construction started in 1952 and lasted until 1955. A gift from the Soviet Union to the people of Poland, the tower was constructed, using Soviet plans, almost entirely by 3500 workers from the Soviet Union, of whom 16 died in accidents during the construction. The architecture of the building is closely related to several similar skyscrapers built in the Soviet Union of the same era, most notably the Moscow State University and the Moscow Kremlin Spasskaya tower.





    Photo By: mong789

    However, the main architect Lev Rudnev incorporated some Polish architectural details into the project by traveling around Poland and seeing the architecture. The monumental walls are headed with pieces of masonry copied from renaissance houses and palaces of Krakow and Zamosc.Shortly after opening, the building hosted the 5th World Festival of Youth and Students. Many visiting dignitaries toured the Palace, and it also hosted performances by notable international artists, such as a 1967 concert by the Rolling Stones, the first by a major western rock group behind the Iron Curtain.

    As the city's most visible landmark, the building was controversial from its inception. Many Poles initially hated the building because they considered it to be a symbol of Soviet domination, and at least some of that negative feeling persists until today. Some have also argued that, regardless of its political connotations, the building destroyed the aesthetic balance of the old city and imposed dissonance with other buildings. However, over time, and especially in recent years, Warsaw has acquired a number of other skyscrapers of comparable height, so that the Palace now fits somewhat more harmoniously into the city skyline. Furthermore, since Soviet domination over Poland ended in 1989, the negative symbolism of the building has much diminished. Four 6.3-metre clock faces were added to the top of the building in 2000, making it briefly the tallest, and now the world's second-tallest, clock tower (after the NTT DoCoMo Yoyogi Building, to which a clock was added in 2002).





    Photo By: mong789

    The inhabitants of Warsaw still commonly use nicknames to refer to the palace, notably Pekin (Beijing in Polish, because of its abbreviated name PKiN), Pajac ("clown", a word that sounds close to Palac), Stalin's syringe or even the Russian Wedding Cake. The terrace on the 30th floor, at 114 metres, is a well-known tourist attraction with a panoramic view of the city. An old joke held that the best views of Warsaw were available from the building: it was the only place in the city from where it could not be seen (a claim originally made by the French writer Guy de Maupassant about the Eiffel Tower).

    The building currently serves as an exhibition centre and office complex. It is also used for FM and TV broadcasting. It is 237 metres (778 ft) tall which includes the height of the spire of 49 metres. There are 3288 rooms on 42 floors, with an overall area of 123,000 square metres, containing cinemas, theatres, museums, offices, bookshops, and a large conference hall for 3000 people. In fact, an accredited university, Collegium Civitas, makes its home on the 11th and 12th floors of the building.




    Photo By: afagen

    Greetings

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    Warsaw Old Town Square Cafes



    Photo By: ipomoea310

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